Organisational change in arts and culture

This section has research that examines how organisations have successfully dealt with organisational change, how they have coped with shocks, and how they can adapt to new business models and funding sources.

The summaries in this category are:

The consequences of focusing on charismatic leadership in the arts

This research was conducted by Melissa Nisbett and Ben Walmsley at at King’s College London and the University of Leeds, UK.

Summary
This study sets out to assess the role of charisma in cultural leadership, noting that the arts sector seems to be particularly invested in individuals perceived to be inspirational […]

By |21 July 2016|

‘Digital’ has changed organisations’ strategies as well as their technology

This research was conducted by Ross Parry at the University of Leicester, UK
Summary
The use of digital technology in museums is no longer something special or revolutionary. This paper focuses on what that means for museums’ strategies and structures. It finds that the digital turn has not simply meant the […]

By |28 August 2014|

The effects of performance management culture on museums

This research was conducted by Anwar Tlili at King’s College London, UK
Summary
This paper looked at the way in which museums have adopted new forms of performance management, partially in response to the changing beliefs of policymakers and funders. The core of the research is based on a series of […]

By |26 April 2014|

Using mentoring to embed organisational change

This research was conducted by Jonathan Paquette at the University of Ottawa, Canada

Summary
This paper looks at how mentoring affected organisational change and renewal in a number of large museums in the UK. The research found that mentors frequently supported their protégés in their agendas for change, even though mentoring typically […]

By |16 April 2014|

When it comes to museum innovation, size matters

This research was conducted by Carmen Camarero, Mª José Garrido and Eva Vicente at the University of Valladolid, Spain
Summary
The paper presents the results of a study into the relationships between museum characteristics, innovation levels and performance. They found that larger museums were more likely to innovate in technology and organisational […]

By |11 April 2014|

Capital projects have the potential to bankrupt arts organisations

This research was conducted by Dana Elmquist at Baruch College CUNY, USA
Summary
The paper is based on interviews with three cultural leaders in New York who were dealing with the legacy of substantial capital projects. The research concludes that organisations must realise that they are ‘masters of their own destiny’ in financial […]

By |11 April 2014|

Community consultation puts overstretched organisations on a better footing

This research was conducted by Ellen Rosewall at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, USA
Summary
The paper looked at developments in the state of Wisconsin in the USA, where ‘nearly 100’ capital projects have taken place since the early 1990s, a majority of the projects have a school connection and are in […]

By |11 April 2014|

Arts organisations should not blindly adopt corporate management techniques

This research was conducted by Martin Beirne and Stephanie Knight at the University of Glasgow and Queen Margaret University College, UK
Summary
This paper took a critical look at the way in which management techniques from the private sector have infused arts organisations. The authors suggest that simply incorporating management practices without […]

By |20 March 2014|

Strategic management will make museums more effective in achieving their goals

This research was conducted by Eva M. Reussner at Deakin University, Australia
Summary
This paper took a critical look at how strategic management might be applied to the running of museums. By applying this technique from outside the non-profit world, museums can create greater value for their visitors whilst expanding their visitor […]

By |20 March 2014|