Intrinsic impacts of arts and culture

The intrinsic impacts of arts and culture relate to the ways in which people are affected by these phenomena. The sort of intrinsic impacts found in this section include the feeling of escape from daily life, being made to think afresh about the world, or perhaps enjoying a moment of self-reflection.

The summaries in this category are:

Dance as a form of emotion-sensitivity training

This research was conducted by Julia F. Christensen, Antoni Gomila, Sebastian B. Gaigg, Nithura Sivarajah and Beatriz Calvo-Merino at City University London and University of the Balearic Islands
Summary
Expertise in the arts is known to be associated with changes in the structure and function of the brain, leading artists to […]

By |30 January 2017|

The different effects of group singing on middle-class and marginalised people

This research was conducted by Betty A. Bailey and Jane W. Davidson at the University of Sheffield, UK
Summary
Singing in a group can bring profound positive emotional results, though the exact nature of the benefits may vary with the singer’s background. This study examined the experiences of Canadian singing groups, […]

By |4 July 2016|

Cultural value is best understood through conversations with audiences

This research was conducted by Ben Walmsley at the University of Leeds, UK
Summary
This article presents findings from an in-depth project carried out with five audience-participants at cultural events during Leeds’ annual LoveArts festival. The researchers asked participants to explain what the arts meant to them. They discovered that people […]

By |9 June 2016|

Reading literary fiction improves emotion recognition

This research was conducted by Jessica E. Black and Jennifer L. Barnes at the University of Oklahoma, USA
Summary
This study aimed to replicate previous findings that have shown reading literary fiction to enhance people’s Theory of Mind (the ability to infer and reason about our own and others’ beliefs, desires […]

By |6 June 2016|

Subsidised performances are more innovative and imaginative

This research was conducted by Joshua Edelman and Maja Šorli at the University of London, UK and the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Summary
Findings from a study conducted in 2014 indicate that subsidised performances were considered more challenging than commercial performances. Amateur performances were rated of lower quality but participants praised […]

By |14 December 2015|

How art changes your brain

This research was conducted by Anne Bolwerk and four others at University Hospital Erlangen and Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Summary
Looking at art can invoke strong emotions, but can it actually change the connections you make in your brain? Researchers in Germany recruited 28 adults and randomly assigned them into either evaluating […]

By |7 December 2015|

Attempting to measure the intrinsic value of live music

This research was conducted by Adam Behr, Matt Brennan and Martin Cloonan at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, UK
Summary
This paper examined how various people (particularly concert-goers) articulate the value of live music. The paper looked specifically at six concerts across a range of genres at […]

By |5 May 2015|

Reading fiction is related to developing empathic skills

This research was conducted by P. Matthijs Bal and Martijn Veltkamp at VU University Amsterdam and FrieslandCampina, Deventer, The Netherlands
Summary
This study reports two experiments designed to measure changes in readers’ empathic skills over one week by getting participants to read either fiction or non-fiction writing. In the fiction groups, […]

By |11 December 2014|

Setting the right conditions for community dance

This research was conducted by Jennie Norfield and Sanna Nordin-Bates at the University of Birmingham and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, UK

Summary
This paper looked at what conditions are needed to maximise the positive benefits of community dance by engendering a sense of satisfaction, enjoyment and motivation. The […]

By |16 April 2014|

Measuring intrinsic benefits of theatre with the Arts Audience Experience Index

This research was conducted by Jennifer Radbourne, Hilary Glow and Katya Johanson at Deakin University, Australia
Summary
This paper summarises the early development of the Arts Audience Experience Index by researchers and arts organisations in Australia. It is an adaptable tool that can be used to measure the intrinsic impacts of attendance […]

By |10 April 2014|