Consumer behaviour in arts and culture

This section looks at how people engaging in arts and culture tend to behave as consumers: how they make decisions about ticket purchases, how they may be encouraged to spend more, how they interact with one another, and how they use cultural spaces.

The summaries in this category are:

Using ‘bundling’ to increase attendance and loyalty

This research was conducted by Emma Hall, Wayne Binney and Julian Vieceli at Deakin University and Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
Summary
This paper examines how performing arts companies can increase customer loyalty and attendance by utilising the marketing tool known as bundling. Loyalty and attendance can be increased by offering […]

By |20 March 2017|

How commercial music festivals balance their budgets

This research was conducted by R. Scott Hiller at Fairfield University, USA
Summary
This paper investigates how four large commercial festivals (Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, Coachella, and Lollapalooza) make their production decisions in order to keep costs low and quality high. The paper found that known quality is important, but so […]

By |23 February 2017|

Explaining the decline in music sales due to file-sharing

This research was conducted by Stan J. Liebowitz at the University of Texas-Dallas, USA
Summary
This paper brings together about a dozen studies that have charted the effect of file-sharing on sales of recorded music (and the revenue derived from those sales). It finds that prior to the dawn of streaming […]

By |28 July 2016|

Smart women, rich men, no kids: couples’ arts engagement in Italy

This research was conducted by Elizabetta Lazzaro and Carlofilippo Frateschi at HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Netherlands and University of Padua, Italy
Summary
This paper explored how much the arts occupied the time of couples, both separately and together. The analysis took in both attending arts events (e.g. going to […]

By |16 June 2016|

Theatre-going as a type of ‘rational addiction’

This research was conducted by Concetta Castiglione and Davide Infante at the University of Bologna and University of Calabria, Italy
Summary
This study looked at whether ‘rational addiction’ theories may help explain theatre-going in Italy. It took data across a 34-year period to discover that a rational addiction model of habit-formation can actually […]

By |2 June 2016|

The ‘literary bestseller’ – how to market a contradiction in terms

This research was conducted by Marie-Pierre Pouly at the University of Limoges, France

Summary
Using Zadie Smith’s White Teeth (2000) as a case study, the author explores what makes for a ‘literary bestseller’: a seemingly contradictory cultural phenomenon which enjoys both serious scholarly attention and a mass market success. Based on […]

By |26 May 2016|

Changing patterns of musical tastes

This research was conducted by Omar Lizardo and Sara Skiles at the University of Notre Dame, USA
Summary
This paper looked at differences in people’s music taste across age groups and over time in the USA. The researchers concentrated on the phenomenon of ‘symbolic exclusion’: namely, the propensity of people to […]

By |21 March 2016|

The success of art galleries: a matter of innovation and information

This research was conducted by Aloys Prinz, Jan Piening and Thomas Ehrmann at the University of Muenster, Germany
Summary
What process determines the fact that the art market is dominated by a few very successful and influential galleries? The key finding of this study is that innovation and information flows are […]

By |11 February 2016|

Word-of-mouth shapes teenage music consumption

This research was conducted by Noémi Berlin, Anna Bernard and Guillaume Fürst at the University of Edinburgh, UK; the University of Paris I (Panthéon Sorbonne), France and the University of Geneva, Switzerland
Summary
This paper looked at the role of price and marketing on the popularity of songs in the commercial […]

By |4 January 2016|

Subsidised performances are more innovative and imaginative

This research was conducted by Joshua Edelman and Maja Šorli at the University of London, UK and the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Summary
Findings from a study conducted in 2014 indicate that subsidised performances were considered more challenging than commercial performances. Amateur performances were rated of lower quality but participants praised […]

By |14 December 2015|